Peugeot 3008

Introduction

The 3008 is Peugeot's first attempt at a crossover model - and it's a good one. It's not as spacious as the much larger 5008 MPV, but it's a fine choice for those who want all the space and versatility they can get for their cash, but don't necessarily need seven seats. It's practical, refined and easy to drive with a top notch interior.

What are its rivals?

Crossovers are big business these days and the Nissan Qashqai is the car to beat - mainly because it was the first crossover out there and has been a mainstay at the top of the UK sales charts ever since. Hyundai's iX35, the Skoda Yeti and the Ford Kuga are just a few of the increasing number of crossovers on sale that the Peugeot has to beat.

How does it drive?

The 3008 is no sports car, but it's very easy to drive and refined from behind the wheel. The 2.0-litre 163bhp HDi diesel engine in our test car suited the big Peugeot well with its smooth power delivery - there was still sufficient punch available for overtaking when we needed it, too.

The six-speed automatic transmission is just as laid back and easy to use as the engine - it shifts gears smoothly and seamlessly, and isn't fussy like many diesel autos can be.

What's impressive?

The quality of the 3008's interior is a massive leap forward compared to Peugeots of old. The fit and finish is of exceptional quality, from the dashboard down to the carpet and the 3008 seems to belie its price in this area. The high driving position is equally good too, as it makes for top visibility. Our Exclusive model may be the most expensive of the range, but it is far from short of kit. It comes with goodies like a panoramic glass roof, a head-up display, automatic headlights and wipers and a distance alert feature.

What's not?

Cars from the mid-spec Sport model upwards come with Peugeot's Dynamic Roll Control package, which improves the handling no end and counteracts body roll during corners. However, those without it suffer, and have a habit of pitching and rolling through bends. It's best to pay a little more and go for a 3008 that has it.

Also, rear legroom isn't the best in the class and the 2.0-litre HDi engine fitted to our test car isn't that cheap to run with 42.8mpg and 173g/km, though cleaner and more frugal versions are available, like the HDi 112, which offers 55.6mpg and 135g/km.

Should I buy one?

If you're in the market for a practical crossover then you could do an awful lot worse than the 3008. The interior is arguably the best in its class and the Peugeot is very practical and user friendly, so it's ideal for anyone who regularly hauls children and luggage around. Well priced and a great all-rounder.

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